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IN THE PRESS

Print News Coverage of Making David Into Goliath

"How The World Turned Against Israel"

- Gary Rosenblatt, New York Jewish Week

 

“Some Favorite Books from This Year (and Earlier)”

- Tevi Troy, National Review

 

“Here’s How The World Turned Against Israel”

- An author Q&A with Lee Smith,  Weekly Standard

 

 “Propaganda War”

- Linda Chavez, New York Post 

 

“Editorial: the Middle East – David, Goliath”

- Richmond, Times Dispatch

 

 “Democrats Losing Moral Clarity on Israel”

- Jeff Jacoby, Boston Globe

 

RADIO / PODCASTS / TV

Interview on Christian Broadcast Network

Jennifer Wishon, May 30, 2019 /CBN News

Podcast on Jim Bohannon Show

(4/12/2019 - beginning at minute 40:05)

Episode 240: Heaven on Earth by Joshua Muravchik

John J. Miller is joined by Joshua Muravchik to discuss his book, Heaven on Earth, April1, 2019

Making David into Goliath / July 14, 2014, C-SPAN

Joshua Muravchik talked about his book, Making David into Goliath: How the World Turned Against Israel, in which he discusses why the international community’s opinion of Israel has declined since the 1967 war. He said that oil and geopolitics were to blame early on, but argued that world opinion is mostly shaped by leftist intellectuals and activists who side with the Palestinians. Mr. Muravchik spoke at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C.

The Next Founders  / June 15, 2009, C-SPAN

Joshua Muravchik talked about his book The Next Founders: Voices of Democracy in the Middle East, published by Encounter Books. He profiled seven people from the Middle East who are fighting for democracy and political freedom. Mr. Muravchik’s subjects, both men and women, come from Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Iran, Egypt, Palestine, Kuwait, and Syria. He talked about creating the book and the background and statuses of his subjects. Mr. Muravchik was joined by panelists who commented on his book. They focused on whether the tpe of Middle Eastern liberals portrayed in the book are too small in number, too Westernized, too shallowly rooted in their societies, and too secular in their orientation to be an effective engine of democratic change in the region. The panelists answered questions from members of the audience.